Fireplace Safety

A fireplace safety gate

They’re beautiful and cost-effective, but most fireplaces present a potential safety hazard for your children – even when they’re not in use. In fact, the very things that give the fireplace its beauty are oftentimes the same reasons they can be dangerous. Because while brick, wood, and mortar make for long-lasting, dependable fireplace construction, they’re also hard to fall upon of crash into, meaning your child could face cuts and bruises or worse.

Fireplace dealers recommend taking the following steps to making sure your fireplace is a safe place for your children.

Reduce Harmful Injuries With a Heath Pad

Falling on a brick, marble, or concrete hearth can present plenty of cuts and bruises dangers to even older children (and adults.) Falling against the edge of brick or concrete hearth can present risks that are even more serious.

Use a hearth pad to cushion the heart’s hard, sharp edges. Similar to a bumper, the hearth pad fits around the top edge of the hearth with tape or other non-permanent adhesive. It’s treated to be resistant to heat, so you can still enjoy your fireplace even with the mat protecting your kids.

Keep Small Children at a Safe Distance with a Fireplace Gate

Similar to the mesh screens used to cordon off staircases, fireplace gates also sometimes resemble small fences. They’re sometimes tri-fold, like a wardrobe screen, and made of material durable enough to stand up to a child’s pushing and jostling. (Some models have five segments instead of the usual three.) Other models resemble a small garden fence, complete with swinging entry gate.

Hearth gates also work in the backyard, too, keeping children at a safe distance from barbecue pits and grills.

Teach Your Children The Basics Of Fireplace Safety

Fireplace Safety

The hearth pad runs along the hearth's top outer edge.

Educating your children on the importance of fire safety – and fireplace caution and safety – remains the most effective means of preventing hurtful injuries not just in your house but out in the world, as well.

Fire safety is also a great way to spend time with your kids, helping them understand why fire safety remains important and that you’re trusting them with valuable information.

A partial list of fire safety rules to remember should include:

  1. Matches are not toys. They should only be used to start fires inside the fireplace.
  2. The fireplace, including the hearth and mantel, are not a playset. Children shouldn’t hang from the mantel or jump off the hearth.
  3. The fireplace interior – known as the firebox – is off limits. Children should be taught not to climb inside or remove any screens or doors in order to get inside.
  4. Likewise, stacked firewood beside the fireplace or outside should not be climbed on or otherwise disturbed. Falling logs can hurt, and smaller children can get ankles caught between logs as they fall.
  5. If a fire is lit inside the fireplace, children should be taught not to approach closer than three feet from the hearth. Also, they should never wear loose or bagging clothing around the fireplace or around stacks of firewood.

For more on helping children avoid fire-related injuries, check out our Parent’s Guide to Barbecue and Campfire Safety

Fire SafetyOutdoor barbecues and camping trips are a great way to build memories that last a lifetime, but parents should take precautions to make sure such family-friendly excursions don’t end in tragedy. The U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) reports that each year almost 5,000 Americans are injured by outdoor grill fires, while the Dayton Children’s Medical Center estimates that campfires make up almost 75 percent of all children’s camping-related injuries.

Fire prevention experts recommend taking the following steps to keep barbecues and campfires safe.

Campfire Safety

The National Institute of Health reports that most child-related campfire injuries stem from children walking or falling into the fire. Clear a four-foot area around the campfire site of any loose debris including stones, fallen leaves and branches, and other obstacles, and make sure the site isn’t placed near dry grasses and wood. Circle the campfire with stones or a metal ring to help contain its kindling and ash.

Once the fire is lit, keep it burning slowly, and instruct children how to place – not throw – sticks and twigs into the flames. When roasting marshmallows or other snacks, make sure children’s hands and arms aren’t covered, and that long hair is tied back. Roasters shouldn’t be waved in the fire but kept steady at a safe height above the fire’s base. Keep a bucket of soil  nearby at all times for quick dousing.

When extinguishing the fire, never pour water directly on the hot wood or coals; this can release trapped gasses underneath that can explode. Instead, toss water in small amounts around the fire, and smother the flames with dirt as well. Fires buried beneath soil without wetting can sometimes smolder on, presenting a fire hazard.

Barbecue Safety

Fire Safety

An outdoor firepit

Barbecue pits and grills should never be used within enclosed areas, as this can cause dangerous buildups of carbon dioxide. Loose clothing should not be worn around the grill surface, and children should be kept several feet away from the grill while it’s in use.

Propane tanks should be securely connected and never overfilled.

Keep matches away from children during the barbecue and out of their reach at all other times. Never add lighter fluid to an already-burning grill fires, as the resulting flashback creates both explosion and fire hazards.

Once the barbecue is over, dispose of hot coals by dousing them with water and stirring them to make sure all embers are extinguished. Never store burnt coals in plastic, paper, or wooden bags or boxes.

Parents can get additional information at the USFA Web site.